Buoyed by the success of Disneyland, and perhaps by Rouse's words, Disney would go on to try to imagineer a real city: EPCOT, the Experimental Prototype Community of Tomorrow, code-named "Project X". It was to be build near Orlando, neighbor to a new, larger theme park, and home to twenty thousand people, with multimodal public transportation, a fifty-acre domed civic center with retail and entertainment streets copied from cities around the world, and easy commutes from suburban subdivisions organized much like Radburn. Cars on the outside, houses, kids, and lawns on the inside. As Marling describes the plans: "Factoris looked properly industrial, with their towers and stacks aglow in the darkness. But they were clean and eerily deserted, as if to suggest their unobtrusive silence. Houses were showpieces, grouped in amiable kaffeeklatsches around fortuitous lakes. Sealed away in its fifty-acre dome, the inner city had been sanitized for the protection of a generation of skittish suburbanites who never went downtown anymore." The dome was obviously inspired by Buckminster Fuller's sphere at Expo 67 in Montreal, itself a fragment of Fuller's earlier proposal to erect a great claimant-controlled dome over Manhattan. The oval plan, with its wheel-shaped transportation corridors, recalled the turn-of-the-century garden cities of planner Ebenezer Howard, with a commercial center, a greenbelt, and pie wedges of residential development nested within each other in concentric circles.

The Design of Childhood - Alexandra Lan…