“Superarchitettura is the architecture of superproduction, superconsumption, superinduction to consume, the supermarket, the superman, super gas.” Soon after the exhibition, however, Archizoom and Superstudio began to argue as to the best way to encourage revolutionary architecture: Superstudio proposed to invent a completely new architecture, one that could incorporate dreamy ideals, while Archizoom sought to take consumerism and modernism to their logical extremes by exalting kitsch and industrial tropes, a motive most clearly seen in their celebrated “No-stop City.”

No-stop City is an unbuilt project, one that is, however, well documented in drawings, photographs and a 2006 monograph. The drawings show an infinitely extending grid, subdivided by partial lines symbolizing walls, and interrupted only by natural features such as mountains. The photographs portray an endless and rather featureless space in which humans live as campers. Spaces are filled with rocks and branches, small pieces of nature brought inside the artificial world. Tents, appliances, and motorcycles show that basic needs are met, while other drawings show endless grids of bedrooms, perhaps containing the Dream Bed or Safari Chair.
Archizoom - No Stop City 
Added a year ago by Neil Doshi
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Archizoom - No Stop City 
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“Superarchitettura is the architecture of superproduction, superconsumption, superinduction to consume, the supermarket, the superman, super gas.” Soon after the exhibition, however, Archizoom and Superstudio began to argue as to the best way to encourage revolutionary architecture: Superstudio proposed to invent a completely new architecture, one that could incorporate dreamy ideals, while Archizoom sought to take consumerism and modernism to their logical extremes by exalting kitsch and industrial tropes, a motive most clearly seen in their celebrated “No-stop City.” No-stop City is an unbuilt project, one that is, however, well documented in drawings, photographs and a 2006 monograph. The drawings show an infinitely extending grid, subdivided by partial lines symbolizing walls, and interrupted only by natural features such as mountains. The photographs portray an endless and rather featureless space in which humans live as campers. Spaces are filled with rocks and branches, small pieces of nature brought inside the artificial world. Tents, appliances, and motorcycles show that basic needs are met, while other drawings show endless grids of bedrooms, perhaps containing the Dream Bed or Safari Chair.
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