@[email protected]: One of the worst things about Twitter is in order to gamify communicating and socializing they need to create the impression that the most important thing in the world is what you write on social media.
Alice Clearwater
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One of the worst things about Twitter© is that the corporation running it understands that in order to gamify communicating and socializing they need to create the impression that the most important thing in the world is what you write on social media.

That's the thing I think we should really avoid across the Fediverse - the very idea that it matters tremendously what some jackass says. That's first step to the monetization of content, the injection of inflated "value" into it.

I also think this ties into the idea of "professionalization" on Twitter - the notion that whatever you say on Twitter somehow represents you, more than the sum total of your life. That idea is also structurally part of the monetization of BigSocial - and it results in massive harm to almost everyone - from losing jobs to harassment campaigns, to front page news stories about something an everyday person tweeted.

Instead of elevating the Tweet or the toot to the status of manifesto, why not think about social posting as ongoing, constantly edited speech - like a conversation. One of the sources of misunderstanding between humans is frequently the idea that one thing you said in the past defines you and everything you say after. But it doesn't. Conversations and thoughts and meaning are always producing, reproducing, evolving, changing. We really do have to make room for change.

Consider for example the fact that employers now think it's acceptable to judge you based on what you've posted on social media. Why? they wouldn't hire someone to follow you into a restaurant and eavesdrop on the conversation you have with friends at dinner, or tape record you while you talk in a bar? How and why did social media become a space of binding declaration, instead of a place of conversation? I'd argue that is what capitalism forced it to become.

I didn't entirely get it at first, but this is why nonsense, Dadaism, shitposting, rambling, and the absurdist memes - all of these are vital to the potential Mastodon represents, which is truly taking back the online social space and destroying the myth that what you toot will close doors for you, set the course of your life somehow.

Engagement, play, fun, silliness, and whining, complaining, critiquing, and seriousness all have a place. They don't define us, however, we define them.

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