Anni Albers’s strength and style shines in this photograph of her harvesting corn as a faculty member of Black Mountain College, in Asheville, North Carolina.
Roberto Greco
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BMCM+AC Bookstore (@bmcbooks) on Instagram:

“With harvest season upon us, we’re thinking about the Black Mountain College farm—an absolutely integral part of daily life at BMC that made it not only a school, but a whole living-learning-working community reliant on the efforts of all. It was in October 1933, at the second-ever meeting of the BMC Board of Fellows, that they unanimously approved making “an investigation of the possibility of using Blue Ridge and adjacent property for agricultural purposes in the interest of the College.” David Silver describes the founding of the farm in depth in his contribution to The BMC Special Edition of Appalachian Journal, available at bmcbooks.com.

Repost @albers_foundation:
Anni Albers’s strength and style shines in this photograph of her harvesting corn as a faculty member of Black Mountain College, in Asheville, North Carolina. The school was committed to democratic governance and depended on its community of teachers and students to maintain its operation (including farm work, construction projects, and kitchen duty). Teaching and learning happened in all aspects of life, and the arts were central. Anni and Josef Albers taught at Black Mountain College from 1933 to 1949. Their focus on hands-on learning and experimentation transformed art instruction in America during the twentieth century. (Anni Albers in the cornfields, Black Mountain College, ca. 1937. Photo: Josef Albers) #albersfoundation #annialbers #josefalbers #blackmountaincollege #summerharvest”

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