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John Zorn

  • by Chad Mazzola
  • 19 blocks • 4 hours ago

Self-transcendence

  • by Chad Mazzola
  • 55 blocks • a day ago

Know yourself as Nothing. Feel yourself as Everything.
— Alan Watts

Added by Chad Mazzola
Updated a day ago

"To be engrossed by something outside ourselves is a powerful antidote for the rational mind, the mind that so frequently has its head up its own ass—seeing things in such a narrow and darkly narcissistic way that it presents a colo-rectal theology, offering hope to no one." — Anne Lamott, Bird by Bird

Added by Chad Mazzola
Updated a day ago

"It was a tremendously painful thing to do, especially in the beginning. It’s like in the everyday world, you’re just plugged into all the possibilities. Every time you get bored, you plug yourself in somewhere: you call somebody up, you pick up a magazine, a book, you go to a movie, anything. And all of that becomes your identity, the way in which you’re alive. You identify yourself in terms of all that. Well, what was happening to me as I was on my way to Ibiza was that I was pulling all those plugs out, one at a time: books, language, social contacts. And what happens at a certain point as you get down to the last plugs, it’s like the Zen thing of having no ego: it becomes scary, it’s like maybe you’re going to lose yourself. And boredom then becomes extremely painful. You really are of your own being. But when you get them all pulled out, a little period goes by, and then it’s absolutely serene, it’s terrific. It just becomes really pleasant, because you’re out, you’re all the way out." — Robert Irwin in Seeing Is Forgetting the Name of the Thing One Sees

Added by Chad Mazzola
Updated a day ago

"If there is a state where the soul can find a resting-place secure enough to establish itself and concentrate its entire being there, with no need to remember the past or reach into the future, where time is nothing to it, where the present runs on indefinitely but this duration goes unnoticed, with no sign of the passing of time, and no other feeling of deprivation or enjoyment, pleasure or pain, desire or fear than the simple feeling of existence, a feeling that fills our soul entirely, as long as this state lasts, we can call ourselves happy, not with a poor, incomplete and relative happiness such as we find in the pleasures of life, but with a sufficient, complete and perfect happiness which leaves no emptiness to be filled in the soul." — Rousseau

Added by Chad Mazzola
Updated a day ago

Blockchain

  • by Chad Mazzola
  • 11 blocks • 2 days ago

Book Lists

  • by Chad Mazzola
  • 58 blocks • 4 days ago

Black product

  • by Chad Mazzola
  • 10 blocks • 4 days ago
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Added by Chad Mazzola
Updated 4 days ago

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Added by Chad Mazzola
Updated 4 days ago

Your work

  • by Chad Mazzola
  • 52 blocks • 5 days ago

When was the last time you felt comfortable doing nothing? Not for an hour or a day, but in general, with no immediate projects at hand? Lewis said he has no problem with inactivity if nothing worthwhile has captured his attention. If he believed that being industrious was important, he said, "I'd be panicked at the question 'What are you working on?' if I wasn't working on anything."

Have you ever taken on a project just so you wouldn't be inactive, just to keep things going? How many better opportunities have you missed because that project made you too busy to pursue them? Being willing to be inactive or less active means you'll be available when something truly worthy of your best effort comes along. It also means you'll have the time and space to go looking for those really worthwhile projects. If you're busy being busy, you'll miss them.

Added by Chad Mazzola
Updated 5 days ago

In April 2016, I traveled to Cambridge to hear him give a solo concert, also titled “Avenging Angel,” at Harvard, where his friend Vijay Iyer had organized a festival. Taborn had been preparing for the concert for weeks. He practiced compositions by Bach, Shostakovich and Thelonious Monk, and wrote passages that he could invoke in a moment’s notice in performance. He read poetry, watched old avant-garde films by Stan Brakhage and Kenneth Anger and kept a record of his ideas on a chalkboard that he couldn’t avoid looking at. For several hours a day, he conducted a grueling set of exercises designed to cultivate finger independence and dexterity. In one of those exercises, he held down one finger while playing a series of notes with another, a move that can be very damaging if executed too quickly. The purpose was to improve his command of dynamics, attacks and releases, something he admires in Cecil Taylor, a pianist with “complete control.”

His final form of preparation was listening to his iPod in the rental car he drove to Cambridge. It contains about 45,000 tracks, and Taborn prefers to listen to it on shuffle. “Moving from Xenakis to some metal thing creates a space where you don’t know what you’re listening to anymore,” he told me in his dressing room. “You’re making inferences and connections, and that’s really what composition is. So I don’t worry what I’m listening to. I just like the experience, the change in moods, the feeling of going from a 20-minute composed track to a 30-second blast of metal. Even the discontinuity creates its own logic.”

Added by Chad Mazzola
Updated 5 days ago

Knowledge

  • by Chad Mazzola
  • 40 blocks • 20 minutes ago

Cryptocurrency

  • by Chad Mazzola
  • 10 blocks • 3 days ago

Information

  • by Chad Mazzola
  • 15 blocks • 3 days ago

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