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The Art Market

  • by Christina Badal
  • 17 blocks • about 7 hours ago
'If Another Person Asks Me to Get Them a Jen Guidi I Think I Might Just Vomit in My Bed': The Next Must-Have Market Darling Has Emerged
Added by Christina Badal
Updated about 7 hours ago
One of the World's Greatest Art Collections Hides Behind This Fence
Added by Christina Badal
Updated about 1 year ago

In its new role as money, it is stored in climate-controlled warehouses rather than displayed on walls. As art became money, the institutions that supplied it developed rituals for establishing its money-like properties: alienability, authenticity.

Added by Christina Badal
Updated about 1 year ago

Post-Internet art operates on a mass platform but doubles down on precisely those qualities that Robbins found objectionable, including: "visual art's fixation on the complex issues surrounding representation, visual art's obsession with articulated interplay between form and content, visual art's propensity for criticality [and] visual art's narrow historicity." If Post-Internet art has any of the directness and generosity that Robbins associated with "high entertainment," it's in its appeal to hipness, its instant adoption by the cool kids.

Added by Christina Badal
Updated about 1 year ago

David Robbins was a popular teacher at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (SAIC) until his retirement a few years ago, attracting students with ideas about audience engagement and the possibility of a "conceptual art for the masses," which he called "high entertainment." He collected these thoughts in an "online book" of that title, published in 2009. For Robbins, art is an area of cultural activity distinguished by systemic self-reference; if entertainment appeals directly to its audience, Art (his capital "A") is a "satellite," receiving signals from individual artists and beaming them back to viewers, who can receive them only if their perceptual faculties are properly attuned. That is, audiences for Art have to be looped in to the self-referential game, a process that has traditionally required trips to art institutions and formal schooling. Robbins uses the term "platforming" to describe how artists can disrupt this model, reaching receptive viewers put off by the high barriers to entry into the institutional art world. He names the gallery as one platform, but includes it on a list among the radio show, the TV variety show, the magazine and "a certain kind of website (YouTube, Flickr, MySpace . . .)."

Added by Christina Badal
Updated about 1 year ago