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Sublime/Shit Dialectic

  • by Josh Shi
  • 2 blocks • 4 days ago

"So let’s have a drink of Coke. It’s getting warm. It’s no longer the real Coke, and that’s the problem. You know, this passage from sublime to excremental dimension. When it’s cold, properly served, it has a certain attraction. All of a sudden this can change into shit. It’s the elementary dialectics of commodities."

— Slavoj Zizek, The Pervert's Guide to Ideology

Added by Josh Shi
Updated 4 days ago

“I, as a child, grasped the incompatibility of God and shit and thus came to question the basic thesis of Christian anthropology, namely, that man was created in God’s image. Either/or: either man was created in God’s image – and God has intestines! – or God lacks intestines and man is not like Him.”

“Shit is a more onerous theological problem than is evil. Since God gave man freedom, we can, if need be, accept the idea that He is not responsible for man’s crimes. The responsibility for shit, however, rests entirely with HIm, the Creator of man.”

“The fact that until recently the word “shit” appeared in print as s— has nothing to do with moral considerations. You can’t claim that shit is immoral, after all! The objection to shit is a metaphysical one. The daily defecation session is daily proof of the unacceptability of Creation. Either/or: either shit is acceptable (in which case don’t lock yourself in your bathroom!) or we are created in an unacceptable manner.”

— Milan Kundera, The Eternal Lightness of Being

Added by Josh Shi
Updated 4 days ago
 

Function as ___

  • by Josh Shi
  • 3 blocks • about 2 hours ago
Ludwig Wittgenstein (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy)
Added by Josh Shi
Updated about 2 hours ago
li-function-as-narrative.pdf
Added by Josh Shi
Updated 4 days ago

“...that, to repeat what I heard for years and years and suspect you’ve been hearing over and over, yourself, something’s meaning is nothing more or less than its function. Et cetera et cetera et cetera. Has she done the thing with the broom with you? No? What does she use now? No. What she did with me--I must have been eight, or twelve, who remembers--was to sit me down in the kitchen and take a straw broom and start furiously sweeping the floor, and she asked me which part of the broom was more elemental, more fundamental, in my opinion, the bristles or the handle. The bristles or the handle. And I hemmed and hawed, and she swept more and more violently, and I got nervous, and finally when I said I supposed the bristles, because you could after a fashion sweep without the handle, by just holding on to the bristles, but couldn’t sweep with just the handle, she tackled me, and knocked me out of my chair, and yelled into my ear something like, ’Aha, that’s because you want to sweep with the broom, isn’t it? It’s because of what you want the broom for, isn’t it?’ Et cetera. And that if what we wanted a broom for was to break windows, then the handle was clearly the fundamental essence of the broom, and she illustrated with the kitchen window, and a crowd of the domestics gathered; but that if we wanted the broom to sweep with, see for example the broken glass, sweep sweep, the bristles were the thing’s essence. No? What now, then? With pencils? No matter. Meaning as fundamentalness. Fundamentalness as use. Meaning as use. Meaning as fundamentalness.” 
― David Foster Wallace, The Broom of the System

Added by Josh Shi
Updated 4 days ago